More than 700 Pregnant Women in the U.S. Have Zika

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The latest update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows there are 731 women in the United States with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection.

In addition, there are 1,156 pregnant women in the U.S. territories.

As of Sept. 8, pregnancy data shows 18 liveborn infants with birth defects and five pregnancy losses with birth defects in the United States.

CDC notes the following countries and territories have active Zika virus transmission.

Americas
Anguilla
Antigua and Barbuda
Argentina
Aruba
The Bahamas
Barbados
Belize
Bolivia
Bonaire
Brazil
British Virgin Islands
Cayman Islands
Colombia
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, US territory
Costa Rica
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
French Guiana
Grenada
Guadeloupe
Guatemala
Guyana
Haiti
Honduras
Jamaica
Martinique
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Saba
Saint Barthélemy
Saint Lucia
Saint Martin
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Sint Eustatius
Sint Maarten
Suriname
Trinidad and Tobago
Turks and Caicos
United States
U.S. Virgin Islands
Venezuela
Oceania/Pacific Islands
American Samoa
Fiji
Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia
Marshall Islands
New Caledonia
Papua New Guinea
Samoa
Tonga
Africa
Cape Verde
Asia
Singapore

About These Numbers

According to the CDC, these numbers reflect the number of pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection that have been reported to the pregnancy surveillance systems. There are some delays in reporting. The latest numbers on the total number of pregnant women with Zika are typically available on the individual websites for each jurisdiction.  In addition, reported numbers may increase or decrease as preliminary information is clarified.

This information will help healthcare providers as they counsel pregnant women affected by Zika and is essential for planning at the federal, state, and local levels for clinical, public health, and other services needed to support pregnant women and families affected by Zika, the CDC notes.

What These New Numbers Do Not Show

These new numbers are not comparable to the previous reports. These updated numbers reflect a different, broader population of pregnant women.

These updated numbers are not real time estimates. They will reflect the number of pregnant women reported with any laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection as of 12 noon every Thursday the week prior; numbers will be delayed one week.

Where Do These Numbers Come From?

These data reflect pregnant women in the US Zika Pregnancy Registry and the Zika Active Pregnancy Surveillance System in Puerto Rico. CDC, in collaboration with state, local, tribal and territorial health departments, established these registries for comprehensive monitoring of pregnancy and infant outcomes following Zika virus infection.

The data collected through these registries will be used to update recommendations for clinical care, to plan for services and support for pregnant women and families affected by Zika virus, and to improve prevention of Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

What are the Outcomes for These Pregnancies?

Visit CDC’s webpage for updated counts of poor pregnancy outcomes related to Zika. Most of the pregnancies monitored by these systems are ongoing. CDC will not report outcomes until pregnancies are complete.

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